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Today we bring you the last section of the “changing verbs” in Spanish. This time, VOLVERSE (to turn, to become). The verb volverse indicates a change in the character or condition of a person, usually as a result of circumstances beyond their control. It can be followed by an adjective or by a subject with the indefinite article.

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Hello everybody! Today we bring you the second part of the “changing verbs” found in Spanish. This time when quedarse (to stay) is used with an adjective.
Did you know about this? Let us know in the comments down below with examples of how you’d use it!

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Hello everybody! This week we bring you the first set of grammar for this month. This time, the “verbos of cambio” which are used to talk about physical, emotional or personality changes.
Did you know these? Let us know in the comments down below examples of how you’d use it!

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Hello everybody! Today we bring you the last post of “special verbs” in Spanish. This time the modal verbs. There’re 5: deber (have to; must; should), poder (can; be able to), querer (want), saber (know) and soler (tend to; used to…)
Did you know about these verbs? Try to make a sentence using one of these
verbs in the comments down below!

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Hello everybody! Today we bring you the second part of the grammar section: The reflexive verbs. In this case we’re looking at the conjugation of the verb “PEINAR” (to brush), but you can apply this same format to other verbs such as: afeitar (to shave), vestir (to dress), levantarse (to wake up), etc.
Did you know this about Spanish verbs? Do you know more examples? Let us know in the comments down below!

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Hello everybody! Today we present you the first section of grammar. This week we will learn some “special” verbs in Spanish that act different from the rest. This time, the verb “to like” (gustar), but as you see you can apply this format to the other verbs that appear below, such as: apetecer (to feel like) or asustar (to scare).
Did you know this about Spanish verbs? Do you know more examples? Let us know in the comments down below!

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Hello everyone!
First we wanted to apologise for some spelling errors we did on the last posts where we wrote “objecto” instead of “objeto” and “grámatica” instead of “gramática”. We were a loss for words when we noticed our mistake, but that shows how even native speakers make mistakes sometimes😅. Hopefully it won’t happen again!
On a lighter note, we bring you today the last bit of grammar for this row, ending with the personal pronoun “SE”.
We know that this topic is a bit tricky to get, so if you have any doubt, please let us know in the comments or dm us, and we’ll gladly help you out!

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Hello everybody! Today we bring you the second part of the grammar lessons. This time: “el objeto directo” which is the person (and sometimes) object that benefits from receiving the action of the verb. It’s always introduced with the prepositions “a” or “para”.
Feel free to ask any question and/or try to give us an example of how you’d use the “objeto directo”!

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Today we bring you a bit of grammar, this time the “objecto directo”, which is used for naming a noun that we have previously mentioned.
How would YOU use it? Give us an example down below!

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Today, we provide you with new activities regarding the grammar and vocabulary we have learnt so far. We would love to see you try in the comments down below! Suerte!

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